Monday, January 31, 2005

Smart People Read This Blog

Reader Ooser Nahmay on Social Security, from the comments:
While it is true that the 76 million baby-boomers will start hitting the Social Security rolls in 2008, the number receiving benefits in 2008 will be just those born in 1946 who retire at the reduced-benefit age of 62. The last of the baby-boomers who reach their full retirement age won't begin receiving benefits until 2031. Social Security certainly needs to be looked at, but depending on who is opining, Eli is either already here, he is visible down the road, or he has not even appeared over the horizon, and with all the variables involved in calculating where Eli is, nobody can know absolutely. What is certain is that Eli is not standing our proverbial doorstep -- the 1.5 trillion dollar social security trust fund surplus assures that. But what is also certain is that with Americans retiring earlier, new retirees outnumbering new workers, and birth rates dropping each year, the seemingly large surplus will not last forever. Steps do need to be taken. Payroll tax increases...reduced benefits...higher contribution limits...diversified investment options...greater incentives to work longer...allow more immigrants in...or Logan's Run.

* * *

The income limit that is subject to the Social Security is adjusted annually, but the tax percentage does not change. It is, and has been since the early 1980's, 6.2% of an employee's pay, with the employer's contribution being an identical dollar-for-dollar match, resulting in a total tax of 12.4% for every dollar of earned income, up to the limit. In 2004, the income limit was $87,900 and for 2005 it is $90,000.

The unknowns that you mentioned, as they relate to Social Security, are just that; unknown. They are statistical guesses, which obviously, cannot not be relied upon. By law, the Social Security Administration has do provide a 75-year projection of its financial condition, and in doing so, must make estimates of such things as birth rates, life expectancies, immigration levels, inflation, and disability percentages, as well as average incomes and retirement ages. In this his day and age, when lawmakers cannot even define what a "family" is, how can they possibly know what the average life expectancy in 2080 is going to be.

As for allowing private investment of Social Security dollars -- well, my fear is twofold. First, what happens to those individuals who make poor investment choices with their tax dollars? Is the government going to sit idly by and watch them retire in poverty? Secondly, could you imagine the fees the investment firms would earn if, suddenly, 150 million individual investment accounts were put in their hands? Alternatively, individuals would have to invest through a government-controlled source, i.e. a new federal agency. Another layer of government controlling individual's investments does not give me a warm and fuzzy feeling.

There you go.

3 Comments:

At 10:55 AM, Blogger Quit Smoking said...

Having discovered your blog through the blooger toolbar, I hope you don't mind saying that I have a ebooks site/blog. It pretty much covers ebooks related stuff. Check it out if you have time.

 
At 2:47 AM, Blogger freestuff2 said...

Hey I was just blog surfing amd I found your blog! Looks Great!

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It deals mostly with toronto pearson airport plus other stuff,
You can save up to 50% your next flight!

You should check it out if you get a chance!!

 
At 4:13 AM, Blogger freestuff2 said...

Hey I was just blog surfing amd I found your blog! Looks Great!

I also have a airline airport
It deals mostly with airline airport plus other stuff,
You can save up to 50% your next flight!

You should check it out if you get a chance!!

 

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For The Record

Seymour Hersh has lost. his. marbles.
The amazing thing is we are been taken over basically by a cult, eight or nine neo-conservatives have somehow grabbed the government. Just how and why and how they did it so efficiently, will have to wait for much later historians and better documentation than we have now, but they managed to overcome the bureaucracy and the Congress, and the press, with the greatest of ease.
Uhh, yeah. They've put a real clamp on the New York Times. And CBS.

Thank God we still have the blogs. No damn cult has got me, Illtellya. Yeah. FUCK the neo-cons ... uhg ... HEY! GET OUT OF ... HEY!!! SOMEBODY HELP M .

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Sunday, January 30, 2005

The Purple Badge Of Courage

222

1 Comments:

At 11:27 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This gives a whole new meaning to "the finger". And for the better. g

 

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The Rare Chance

If you think back, you can surely remember a few unique days in your life ... days that were special, when you knew at the time you were experiencing something great, or beautiful, or important.

We only get a few such days. You can count them on your hands, or if you're older, on your hands and toes. I have several that come immediately to mind. When I was 30 or so I took my girlfriend on a long hike to a 1,200 foot rim overlook in Capitol Reef National Park. It was Summer and bright and desert dry and blue skied, and we tromped alone, over the rises and through the washes, up the slickrock and past the arches, up along the foot of cliffs and domes, up under the wings of the red tailed hawk, up into the blue and over the red, up until all of creation spread below us in silence and beauty.

There, at the top of that cliff and under those warm skies, I withdrew a diamond and on bent knee asked my girlfriend to marry me, and she said "yes."

And the entire time, I knew I should savor that day, drink in the sounds and smells and sights, for it was an important day that would pass only once.

Years before, when I was 18 or so, I strode into the elementary school in which I had learned to add (and not to spell), up the steps that seemed so high years before, through the doors that had seemed so heavy, and into the smells that had occupied my childhood. And in that place so important to my life as a child, I began my life as an adult, voting for the first time, exercising a franchise nurtured with the blood and sacrifice of generations who came before me.

As I signed my name and punched my first ballot, I knew I should savor that day, drink in the pride of adulthood and the honor of those who sacrificed to grant me the privilege, for it was an important day that would pass only once.

We have days like these, from time to time. Some personal, like my day on the cliff and my day in the voting booth, and some public: Challenger. Kennedy. June 7th, 1944. Days where we're self-aware and we realize we're experiencing something remarkable, for good or bad, that we should take in deeply and remember.

Today was such a day. Today I was able to see a people who had, for so long, averted their eyes and scuttled along the edges of walls and streets, who had covered their faces and hushed their tones for fear of drawing deadly attention ... today I saw this people standing tall, exposed faces raised high with pride, striding not along the margins but boldly down the middle of their streets and walkways, directly into the doors of their public places, and with the honor and courage, exercising a right of self determination that places them among the free peoples of the world.

And as I looked into their eyes and saw the purple of their fingers and read the joy and jubilation of their words, I knew I should savor this day, drink in the awe and humility inspired by such courage in the name of what is right, witness with careful attention the birth of a free people, for it is an important day that may pass only once.

2 Comments:

At 11:23 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well done. Worthy of an op-ed piece. g

 
At 5:23 PM, Blogger Mr. Dart said...

I had the great pleasure of watching CNN coverage of the election from a hotel room in Budapest, a place that went through a similar experiance fifteen years ago. I pray I will never, ever underestimate the courage and resiliance of the people of this world who have pushed past their fear to emerge from unimaginable opression.

Way to go, Iraq. May God bless you, everyone.

 

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Saturday, January 29, 2005

I Track The Internet So You Don't Have To

Online fitness calculators. Pace, heart rate, body mass, caloric needs, and more.

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I Track The Internet So You Don't Have To

How fast are you? CNET Bandwidth Meter Speed Test. Me? 2741.9 Kbps. That's faster than Full T1, baby. My provider: Comcast cable.

4 Comments:

At 12:57 PM, Blogger Michele said...

2331.4 kbps on my cable modem, split between three computers, if that makes a difference.

 
At 7:27 PM, Blogger mediaguru @ HookedOnGolfBlog.com said...

1217.2 Kbps

 
At 11:46 PM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 11:50 PM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

Running numerous tests, my speed has varied from 1147.7 to 2148.1. But when I hit the "back" button, I was up in the 14000.0 range. hmmmm, browsing in reverse....

 

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I Track What's Cool So You Don't Have To

Stumbled across an application called Celestia today that's absolutely one of the coolest things created for man and computer. From the "about" note:
Celestia is real-time 3D space simulation which lets you travel through our solar system and to over 100,000 stars in our neighborhood.
And it has everything: comets, planets, spacecraft, asteroids ... everything. You can go anywhere, and see anything, from any distance. Here's a screen capture I took of Titan, with Saturn in the background. Note the shadows of the rings across the face of Saturn. Also note that it's in real time ... this is how it looks, right now, in real life (click the image to see it full-sized).

celestia

This is what computers are for! Go here to download the application; Mac and PC versions are both available, and it's free.

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Geeks Gone WILD!!!

When geeks have too much free time: A mathematical calculation of the Millennium Falcon's rate of acceleration. You gotta see it to believe it.

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I Track The Internet So You Don't Have To

43 Folders: An awesome collection of Mac OSX "best of" application inventories, tips & hacks.

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Friday, January 28, 2005

Courage

On this anniversary, go read: COURAGE.

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Remembering Challenger

It was 19 years ago today.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I'd planned to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the Union, but the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for mourning and remembering. Nancy and I are pained to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people of our country. This is truly a national loss.

Nineteen years ago, almost to the day, we lost three astronauts in a terrible accident on the ground. But, we've never lost an astronaut in flight; we've never had a tragedy like this. And perhaps we've forgotten the courage it took for the crew of the shuttle; but they, the Challenger Seven, were aware of the dangers, but overcame them and did their jobs brilliantly. We mourn seven heroes: Michael Smith, Dick Scobee, Judith Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, and Christa McAuliffe. We mourn their loss as a nation together.

For the families of the seven, we cannot bear, as you do, the full impact of this tragedy. But we feel the loss, and we're thinking about you so very much. Your loved ones were daring and brave, and they had that special grace, that special spirit that says, 'Give me a challenge and I'll meet it with joy.' They had a hunger to explore the universe and discover its truths. They wished to serve, and they did. They served all of us.

We've grown used to wonders in this century. It's hard to dazzle us. But for twenty-five years the United States space program has been doing just that. We've grown used to the idea of space, and perhaps we forget that we've only just begun. We're still pioneers. They, the members of the Challenger crew, were pioneers.

And I want to say something to the schoolchildren of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle's takeoff. I know it is hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen. It's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we'll continue to follow them...

I've always had great faith in and respect for our space program, and what happened today does nothing to diminish it. We don't hide our space program. We don't keep secrets and cover things up. We do it all up front and in public. That's the way freedom is, and we wouldn't change it for a minute. We'll continue our quest in space. There will be more shuttle flights and more shuttle crews and, yes, more volunteers, more civilians, more teachers in space. Nothing ends here; our hopes and our journeys continue. I want to add that I wish I could talk to every man and woman who works for NASA or who worked on this mission and tell them: "Your dedication and professionalism have moved and impressed us for decades. And we know of your anguish. We share it."

There's a coincidence today. On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama. In his lifetime the great frontiers were the oceans, and a historian later said, 'He lived by the sea, died on it, and was buried in it.' Well, today we can say of the Challenger crew: Their dedication was, like Drake's, complete.

The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honoured us by the manner in which they lived their lives. We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for the journey and waved goodbye and 'slipped the surly bonds of earth' to 'touch the face of God.'

Listen to these words here.

4 Comments:

At 7:56 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Still remember it vividly. Carrying our chairs into the other second grade classroom so we could watch it. The horrified look on our teacher's face when she realized what happend. Still remember Reagan too. Think it's one of the only Presidential addresses I remember.

 
At 8:06 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oops. That was me. Always forget. Think it's my old age setting in.

CB

 
At 3:51 PM, Blogger Tyzilee said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 4:00 PM, Blogger bookofblogs said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 

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Proper Music For Highways West

Highways West posts about proper music for western highways. Some strong selections. Personally, given the chance to listen to real cowboy music I'd offer The Cowboy Cultural Society, and of course, the greatest cowboy station of all time, 95.3 The Range out of Dallas, Texas.

1 Comments:

At 4:49 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hi Everett -- Thanks for the nice link. I've been listening to the Cowboy Cultural Society's show, too. Good stuff. Can't think of anywhere else I'd hear Warren Zevon's "Frank & Jesse James" right after the Sons of the Pioneers and Marty Robbins ... though it all makes sense in a topical way. - Cheers, Ken Layne (HighwaysWest)

 

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Oh, Please

Oh please oh please oh please oh please ... especially since my ThinkPad is disintegrating after 3 years of solid use ...

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I Gotta Lay Off The Hot & Sour Soup

So our alarm goes off at 5:15 this morning, and I awake from a very strange dream. I'm taking part in a reality TV show that combines The Apprentice and American Idol. I'm part of the Apprentice team, which has the assignment of preparing and staffing the dinner theater in which the Idolitrans will take part. Lots of strange high school chums running about, and for some reason, at one point I get upset enough with Gilligan (yes, Gilligan) that I'm forced to beat him senseless.

The dream ends with me pairing up with another Apprentice to make enormous chopped salads. As we finish the last salad and the Idols take the stage, one Idol, Kevin, steps into the spotlight to announce:
My name is Kevin, and I'm queer and friendly.

And I'm here to make an announcement ... during this show I've gotten to know Michael back there [another Idolitran], and truth be told just before coming out here tonight we met backstage and had some love. Some naked love. And I just have to say ...
At this point, he breaks into Love is a Many Splendored Thing, and our alarm goes off.

I gotta lay off the hot and sour soup before bed ...

1 Comments:

At 8:15 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm refraining from writing all of the evil things I thinking right now.

CB

 

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Thursday, January 27, 2005

I Track The Blogosphere So You Don't Have To

Mac user? You need to be reading the The Apple Blog.

You're welcome.

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Where Am I?

One sleepy cowboy here, pardners. Got in very late (1 a.m. late) from Chicago last night and a day that began at 4:30 a.m., and am still figuring out which way is up. (Trick question: The coffee cup is always up.)

But it's a bright, cold, and blue-sky day here, and I'm quickly regaining my senses.

Funny experience on the plane last night: It's about 9:15 p.m. in Chicago, and we're boarding. I'm in my isle seat, and a woman walks up to the row in front of me and declares, loudly, "Alright, oneaya's gonna haveta moveuerass! Whoshit gonna be?!"

She. Is. HAMMERED.

One of the other passengers politely points out that she's actually in 10A a seat that's ... surprise ... open. So she makes her way to the seat, and proceeds to talk to the man in 10C. Loudly. Loudly enough that wifey, who's on the phone with me, is saying "Who's that strange woman?"

So this poor guy, who's of Asian decent, is subjected to a stream of her drunken ranting. Examples:
"Letsh go! Letsh goo!! Iwannagohome!!!"

[De-icing begins] "Loook! Shmoke! Wereonfire!!! I'monlykiddn! Bwahahahahaha!!!!"
And this exchange:
"Whereyoufrom, bigboy?"

[With his accent]: "Sicago"

"Where?"

"Sicago."

"WHAT?? WHERE???"

"Si. Ca. Go."

"Ohhhh ... shhicaaago!! Why you goin' to Philly? Work? Fun?"

"I'm going to a funeral ... my great aunt died."

"Awwwww ... I'm shorrry."


[A few moments of nearly incoherent rambling]

"Yaknow ... we're only here for sho long ... ya gatta have fun, you know? I mean, do your thing and fuckem, you know? Pardon my french ..."
I'm certain he felt much better. After a few more minutes of "Letshgo!!" I say to the guy next to me: "What's the over / under on how soon she passes out? I say 15 minutes after takeoff." I was 8 minutes long.

So here's to you, drunken obnoxious racially inappropriate lady. Hope you didn't kill anyone on the way home, and thank God you didn't sit next to me.

1 Comments:

At 1:22 AM, Blogger j said...

when a person like that says "one-uv-ya is gonna hafta moove-ur-ass" I typically get right up, apologize profusely and give him or her my seat -- rolling the dice with the "seating partner" odds.
By weird fluke of coincidence, _I_ sat down on the 12:00 eastbound flight Wednesday afternoon next to Steve @#$%(#&* Emtman!!!!! Steve is number 74 on the College Football News list of all time college players, and was the anchor of the great 1991 University of Washington National Championship team defense (and the number one draft pick by the Colts). "Mr. Emtman?" I say, not beleiving it. "Yes." I tell him how _I was there_ at the home game when he did the post-safety Husky stadium end-zone dance (as if firing pistols at the sky) in the Arizona game, and that it has been one of the great "sports fan" moments of my life. He explains that it was "the luckiest year of [his] life," and suggests that the Arizona player "tripped on my foot" (which is _not_ how I and 70,000 other people remember it). We talk about his business (high end artificial grass), the Dawgs, coaching (he's also working as the UW strength coach), teaching young men and life in general, and he's as nice a guy as you could ever meet. I could have died right then.

p.s. sometimes you can get lucky with those drunk airline passenger chicks (and they don't usually remember).

 

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Tuesday, January 25, 2005

The Morning Read

Good morning from Chicago. Was up at 5 to hit the gym, process mail, and draft a memo to a client prior to my 7:45 am breakfast meeting. While streaming Radio Paradise and scanning the blogs and news (not listening to Radio Paradise yet? I'm shocked. SHOCKED.) this morning, a couple of things caught my eye:
  • Eli's coming. If you remember the spectacular but short-lived Sports Night, there was an episode where one character forecasted coming tribulations by saying "Eli's coming," a reference to the Three Dog Night song. Ever since then, wifey and I use "Eli's coming" whenever there's trouble on the horizon (like a big storm, for example, or, perhaps, another two years with Don Rumsfeld as SecDef). Well, I've got news for you: Eli's coming, and Eli is the 76 million baby boomers that are going to hit the Social Security rolls starting in 2008.

    This is the one issue with the capability to truly knock America from her position of power in the world. Left unchecked, the social services the boomers will require will Bankrupt. Our. Country. Better start getting smart. Here's a Google search on "social security reform" ... pick any link and start reading. (I know: not much of an editorial job by me, but I'm pressed for time here.)

  • Have fun. Stay sane. New research today bolstering assertions that staying mentally and physically active, and to a certain extent, having fun, dramatically decreases your likelihood of getting alzheimer's. Dementia is rare ... hell, nearly non-existent ... among my immediate progenitors. Now I know why: we don't go crazy, because we already are crazy. Crazy like a fox. Crazy for a good time. And, it appears, that helps keep the demons at bay.

    So, in the interest of your sanity, go do something, will ya? Start a blog. Restore a classic car. Get so good at crosswords you can do the Times in ink. Chase that single bitty from across the hall around the old folk's home nekked. It's good for you, I promise.

  • Random Wikipedia Entry of the Day: Sandman: The Dream Hunters.

  • The Next Blog: Florida Politics.
Have a great day, y'all.

5 Comments:

At 7:20 PM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

While it is true that the 76 million baby-boomers will start hitting the Social Security rolls in 2008, the number receiving benefits in 2008 will be just those born in 1946 who retire at the reduced-benefit age of 62. The last of the baby-boomers who reach their full retirement age won't begin receiving benefits until 2031. Social Security certainly needs to be looked at, but depending on who is opining, Eli is either already here, he is visible down the road, or he has not even appeared over the horizon, and with all the variables involved in calculating where Eli is, nobody can know absolutely. What is certain is that Eli is not standing our proverbial doorstep -- the 1.5 trillion dollar social security trust fund surplus assures that. But what is also certain is that with Americans retiring earlier, new retirees outnumbering new workers, and birth rates dropping each year, the seemingly large surplus will not last forever. Steps do need to be taken. Payroll tax increases...reduced benefits...higher contribution limits...diversified investment options...greater incentives to work longer...allow more immigrants in...or Logan's Run.

 
At 2:20 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was glad to see the comments by Ooser Nahmay. I am a recipient of Social Security. I understand that my standing would not be affected. However, that does little to ease the concerns I have for my children and grandchildren. The most prominent fear I have at present is that Congress will be rushed or bulldosed into a decision. ( I do not mean to be mean, but This is the government that brought us to where we are today in Iraq, they had information but I do not feel the time was taken to really validate it). That said, I have a proposition that I have not heard publically discussed. Instead of raising the percentage of taxable income, why not raise the level of income taxed?
At present it is under $100,000. Why not tax all earned income and reduce the 12.5% to 1 or 2%? This would provide additional dollars and also leave more in the pockets of the lower income earners who most likely could use it to provide for families and individual needs of the present. At the lower tax rate those with higher incomes while paying more in would still recieve more at the other end. Perhaps this ( taxing all income) might be a first step towards the more "compassionate society" President Bush would like to see. My husband and I continue to pay social security on our income. We don't resent it.
It's a privilege to live in this country and citizens have responsibilites toward the country.
Another thought that keeps rolling around in my mind speaks to individuals investing part of their income to supplement social security. When we started investing, the first rule we learned was that only monies one could afford to lose should be considered for the market. I am not certain yet how the investing part of the President's program will work. Will each person choose their own broker? Will a government group handle the investments?

I also think the rolls of those who pay the tax should be looked at. I know there are exemptions. Members of Congress do mot pay the tax. They also have a generous pension plan. Maybe we should all have to pay it.

There are still too many unknowns and I don't want to see our country react as Chicken Little. g

 
At 4:25 PM, Blogger Michele said...

What's with all the colors? You're like a kid with a new box of crayons.

When I was young (centuries ago), there was a linen salesman who used to come to our house every Saturday. He had one wooden leg and a glass eye, and his name was Eli. And every week when we saw Eli hobbling up the walk, we would all invariably start singing Eli's Coming.

 
At 3:31 PM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

g--

The income limit that is subject to the Social Security is adjusted annually, but the tax percentage does not change. It is, and has been since the early 1980's, 6.2% of an employee's pay, with the employer's contribution being an identical dollar-for-dollar match, resulting in a total tax of 12.4% for every dollar of earned income, up to the limit. In 2004, the income limit was $87,900 and for 2005 it is $90,000.

The unknowns that you mentioned, as they relate to Social Security, are just that; unknown. They are statistical guesses, which obviously, cannot not be relied upon. By law, the Social Security Administration has do provide a 75-year projection of its financial condition, and in doing so, must make estimates of such things as birth rates, life expectancies, immigration levels, inflation, and disability percentages, as well as average incomes and retirement ages. In this his day and age, when lawmakers cannot even define what a "family" is, how can they possibly know what the average life expectancy in 2080 is going to be.

As for allowing private investment of Social Security dollars -- well, my fear is twofold. First, what happens to those individuals who make poor investment choices with their tax dollars? Is the government going to sit idly by and watch them retire in poverty? Secondly, could you imagine the fees the investment firms would earn if, suddenly, 150 million individual investment accounts were put in their hands? Alternatively, individuals would have to invest through a government-controlled source, i.e. a new federal agency. Another layer of government controlling individual's investments does not give me a warm and fuzzy feeling.

 
At 11:55 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you for clarifying the issue of the percent taken out. My biggest fear is the matter of investing. As I said before, I was taught to invest those dollars that one can afford to lose. I have not heard any discussion of this from the administration. What if funds invested to supplement social security were had no fees attached to them by law?

 

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Monday, January 24, 2005

Windy City

Windy City

Still on the plane as we taxi. Snapped this of The Loop on the way in ...
___
Sent via my Treo 600

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Sunday, January 23, 2005

For The Record

Current record is 19-11 against the spread, and 7-1 in the NFL playoffs. Today's picks:
Eagles - 5 against the Falcons

Steelers + 3 against the Patriots

May your horse come in.

2 Comments:

At 5:45 PM, Blogger mediaguru @ HookedOnGolfBlog.com said...

Hoping for an all PA superbowl.

 
At 11:25 AM, Blogger mediaguru @ HookedOnGolfBlog.com said...

Ok bag that idea.

Sorry to say it but NE will easily cover -7 against Philly in the super bowl.

 

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I Track Culture So You Don't Have To

Radio Paradise - eclectic online rock radio. Great quality, incredible mix, and listener supported. What's more, the home page always has what's playing up top, so you can put a name to that cool tune you'd never heard before.

The 10 most recent songs as I post this:
7:01 am - Tom McRae - A & B Song
6:58 am - Neil Young - Dont Let It Bring You Down
6:55 am - Goran Bregovic - Wedding Cocek
6:52 am - Underworld - Trim
6:45 am - Massive Attack - Angel
6:41 am - The Charlatans - You're So Pretty - We're So Pretty
6:38 am - Michael Penn - Try
6:34 am - Thirteen Senses - Into The Fire
6:30 am - Story of M - Sailor
6:26 am - Rolling Stones - Heaven
You're welcome.

1 Comments:

At 3:45 PM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

This is, perhaps, the most useful information you have ever provided. I've been listening for a few days, now, and I am yet to hear a song that I don't like. The eclectic mix, crispness of the sound, and the complete lack of commercials make it a perfect radio station. In general, it reminds me a lot of the college radio stations I used to listen to, but the sound quality and professional deejays make it far superior. Thanks for the tip.

 

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The Day After

The world is still here. And we're not even hung over.

All told, not a bad state of affairs.

We did, though, get relatively pounded with snow yesterday and last night. See for yourself:
IMG_4620
And thank goodness I ventured out for beer yesterday; we tapped about half a case through the afternoon and evening. Can you imagine if we faced the AFC and NFC championship games without beer on hand?

Shudder.

Yep. Playing with fonts today. Quite easy in Blogger ... why not make the most of the thing?

On today's agenda? Paperwork, blogging, and football. Like my web hottie, I have no problem being housebound; in fact, I enjoy it. I've already hit the roof with the roof rake, a necessity as our older home is highly susceptible to ice dams. We're expecting 30-40 mile per hour winds today, though, so we'll be holding off on the driveway until the drifting has passed.

So that's our day.

One last thing: last night we (finally) saw Lost In Translation. Wifey and I both enjoyed the film, but we came to separate conclusions about its tone. I found it uplifting; her, not so much. What was your take?

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Saturday, January 22, 2005

NOW Who's An Angry Drunk?

Well, I don't know if she's angry ... but I reckon she's drunk. Check out my web hottie and decide for yourself. That DJ ... he gets in a mood and look out. She's lucky the little devil didn't try to screw the cat.

But who's surprised: nothing good ever comes from Apples to Apples anyway.

Back to the beer storm.

2 Comments:

At 1:11 AM, Blogger j said...

speaking of drunk web hotties, how about this headline for the recent story on Paris Hilton's alleged theft of the "One Night in Paris" video from an LA news stand:

"Paris Hilton probed in petty theft."

Talk about your double entendre's. . .

 
At 4:43 AM, Blogger Michele said...

"She's lucky the little devil didn't try to screw the cat."

OH, but that poor snowman...

 

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Who In Their Right Mind ...

... would go out driving in this?
snow
I would. But it was an emergency.

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Polygamy Primer

This is great: The State of the Beehive points to a "polygamy primer" published by the Utah Attorney General's office. (Not to be confused with "Polygamy Porter.") I can only imagine:
  1. "Mary ... no, Sue?" Don't put your foot in your mouth: Keep a cheat sheet on hand to remember each wife's name.

  2. Don't forget the Golden Rule: If there's a sock on the doorhandle, it's her lucky night.

  3. Remember: rotation. As one bride reaches 21, add a 14 year old to the stable. No need to see only wrinkles, man!

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Getting The Inside Skinny On The Weather

For a couple of years now I've relied not on our local National Weather Service forecast to get a bead on the weather, but on the NWS forecast discussion. This is a text product that the NWS forecasters put out for other meteorologists, giving an update on what's happening and what they expect to happen. It's kind of a "one pro to another" thing, and while it's got some jargon and shorthand in it that can be hard to decipher, reading it makes you a fly on the wall as the forecasters try to figure out what's going to happen, and what they're ultimately going to put in the forecast that you see.

Here's an example of the forecast discussion for Salt Lake City. You can find one on any NWS location home page, and they're usually either posted under "Text Products" or "Forecast Discussion" or something similar.

I just bookmark the local discussion page and check it whenever we're wondering about the weather.

You're welcome.

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It's Gonna Snow Snow Snow!

From our undisclosed location on the east coast, we're expecting snowfall today and tonight with accumulations between 10 and 18 inches. We're excited, of course. Sure, I'll have to do the driveway and use the roof rake (ours is an older, ice-dam prone home), but on the whole it'll be great.

Besides, the dog will love it. Witness:

pooch

So it's ... uhh ... 12 degrees at the moment. No snow yet, but we're expecting it to start soon. And we'll hunker down, maybe break out the scotch and a cigar a bit early (even for a Saturday), watch movies, and play on the Mac. Lots of photos to organize, videos to play with, and exploring still to do on the new machine.

Who knows: Maybe I'll even post some shots of conditions as they develop. I believe the replacement charger for the good digital camera (not the poor one on my phone) has finally made the trip from China to our local post office, so they might even be photos of some quality.

Or maybe I'll just sit here and blog until we're snowbound. Who knows. It's that kind of day. Ain't it great?

1 Comments:

At 11:16 AM, Blogger Dave said...

It's so wierd, we hit a record high Thursday, and I've actually used the air conditioner this week (actually I never turned it off, just turned the thermostat up to 80 and it came on several times this week)... I haven't used the heater but once in 3 years...

If you need a change come to Phoenix... it's prime golf weather!

 

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I Track Culture So You Don't Have To

I was a fan of the Clooney/Soderberg HBO creation K Street, which combined reality and fantasy in presenting the inner workings of a DC lobbying firm. Now C & S are on to their next project of the same genre: HBO's Unscripted. The lobbyists have been replaced by actors in LA, trying to make it big. Some of the best TV of the year. Oh .. and Krista Allen is incredibly hot.

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Wednesday, January 19, 2005

The Morning Read

I gotta tell you: our dog kicks ass. She kicks ass generally, but she especially kicks ass on days like this, when it's 12 degrees outside and she sprints to the end of the drive and retrieves the morning paper. 'Cause you don't want to be out there today unless you have to. (As my father would say, "How'd you like to be out there in nothing but a wet sheet?" No thanks.)

I'm headed to Minneapolis in a few hours (Cold Places Winter Tour 2005! Rock on!!), but found a few items of note this morning for your Morning Read:
  • Is the emperor nekked? I was in Washington last week, and could see the inaugural prep as we drove past the Capital. Enormous. And now we know the three-day shin dig is going to run a bill of $40 million. $40 million. And Washington D.C. is paying $17 million of that in security costs. So what's the other $23-odd mil for? Good question. Lots of parties, I suppose. Oh ... and a parade. Don't forget the parade. And paying someone to set up all those chairs. Lots of chairs on that stage.

    Here's some perspective for you: Let's say the average cost of a school lunch in the US is $1.50. For $40 million we could buy roughly 27 million school lunches, which with a 180 day school year would provide all lunch, for an entire year, for 150,000 students ... which is roughly every pre-, elementary, and middle school student in the Philadelphia Public School system.

    Or how about this? For $40 million we could provide all tuition, room, and board at public college for over a thousand people. Or we could send another six thousand kids to Head Start this year.

    Better be one hell of a party. I'm just sayin'.

  • Red rover come over! Our plucky little Mars rovers are still chugging along ... and one's found a meteorite on the surface. Cool.

  • Democracy! Fuck yeah!! Seems the rock band Fuel led off their set at last night's America's Future Rocks Today pre-inaugural concert with "Welcome to the greatest fucking country in the world!" He's right, of course ... but one has to wonder how the Bush family, who were in the audience along with thousands of teenieboppers there to see Hilary Duff, took it. Somehow I don't think it's the first time Jenna and Barbara heard the word ...

  • New feature! Wikipedia entry of the day: Banana Boat.

  • The next blog: Mangq, from Indonesia. Strange, but strangely interesting ...
Good day, all.

2 Comments:

At 10:48 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Wondered if your travel plans would be changed. Sounds as though they were. We never know do we? g

 
At 12:22 AM, Blogger j said...

skied all weekend in sub 10-degree weather -- sometimes you want to be out there even if you don't have to. 'Course, got a nasty little cold to show for it.

 

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Tuesday, January 18, 2005

How To Become A Mind Reader

As part of my job and education, I've forgotten more about nonverbal communication than most people ever learn. And I have to tell you, it gives a person an edge. In poker, for one. In negotiations, for another (never shit a shitter ... and never shit a shitter who understands nonverbal markers of confidence and diffidence). And finally, in day-to-day conversation.

"How'd you know that's what I was thinking?" I often hear. "Well", I think, "because it was right there on your face all along."

Now you can read minds, too: DataFace: Facial Expressions, Emotion Expressions, Nonverbal Communication. A nice online summary of the data. For a less academic take, read this excerpt from Gladwell's Blink.

Now ... go all in. He's bluffing ...

2 Comments:

At 11:40 PM, Blogger Christina said...

Do you play poker?

 
At 7:44 AM, Blogger Everett said...

From time to time, but not often. I've wanted to put a local game together. You?

 

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Listen Up!

Whaddaya know. Plan to go to Barcelona for three weeks and then * POOF * the whole trip gets cancelled. Good news is that this gives me two more nights (with my sweetie) at home, and I find myself today with a completely free schedule.

More proof that bad news, when turned on its side, presents opportunity.

One of the things I've found with my time today: PENNsound. From the website:
PennSound is an ongoing project, committed to producing new audio recordings and preserving existing audio archives. We intend to provide as much documentation about individual recordings as possible; new bibliographic information will be added over time (please contact us if you can supplement the information already provided). As part of the PennSound project, the Schoenberg Center for Electronic Text & Image (SCETI) in collabortation with the Annenberg Rare Book and Mansucript Collection at the University of Pennsylvania is developing a sophisticated cataloguing tool for all our sound files; this should be available in about one year.
Put this through your academic jargon translator and this paragraph resolves to:
Hundreds and hundreds of poems and other literature readings in mp3 format for your iPod or other digital audio player.
Oh ... and it's all free. Cool.

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Monday, January 17, 2005

Seperated At Birth?

About Golf, Golfers and Golf Widows

Golf Blog


If ever two blogs were meant to link ...

1 Comments:

At 12:07 AM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

My New Year's Resolution is to get Racky McRackrack to play, so she does not become another golf widow.

 

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A Different Type Of Comical

I've seen a number of regular references to CAP Alert over at Tom Peyer's place. I'd never followed the link; now that I have, I'm left feeling, well ... I don't rightly (yes, that's a pun ... you'll get it once you follow the link) know. Sort of a cross between icky and disturbed, I suppose.

How else does one react to a web site that describes The Incredibles, one of the most entertaining and sweetest films of the year in my view, thusly:
There are behavioral, moral and value implantation dangers in this film. It is, after all, rated PG. The exaggeration and unbelievability typically associated with animation are limited in this nearly "real-feeling" cartoon adventure into the world of crime-fighting and world-saving. Twenty-first century "adult" realities are thoroughly blended into the lives of the characters, giving this film an unusual feel for a cartoon. For the parent setting next to his/her child, that "feel" may not be comfortable. A reliance on much experiential maturity is obvious to even fathom some of the material in this film: a reliance on experiential maturity that, when forced upon the young observer, may cause moral confusion possibly leading to coping skill friction and decision making aberrations.
Good lord. Will someone please point out the part in the New Testament when Lord God Jesus says "Thou shalt take all the fun out of all shit in my name?" "Moral confusion possibly leading to coping skill friction and decision making aberrations"?? It's a friggin' cartoon, for Chrissakes. And I think Jesus gets the joke.

5 Comments:

At 10:08 PM, Blogger Charley Foster said...

I'm with you. But then, I don't get any particular "feel" when I sit next to my 7 year-old twins watching Ren and Stimpy or South Park either.

 
At 11:55 PM, Blogger Gene Corrigan said...

If he got that bent out of shape about "The Incredibles", I can just picture the reviewer's head getting ready to explode as he watched "South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut".
http://www.capalert.com/capreports/southpark.htm

 
At 5:57 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You are missing the point of the site, which is unusual for one who seems to get the point of most things. It isn't to take the fun out of things, (where did they tell you, an adult, not to go to the movie?) but to give people (admittedly of a particular point of view) a place to find out about entertainment before subjecting either themselves or their children to it. At least on the CAP site, you completely know their bias and can assess their evaluations accordingly. This is a great use of the internet.

As for me, I wish I had seen the CAP site before taking my five-year-old, because I stupidly figured on something more like Monsters Inc, which was not nearly as sinister nor dark as Incredibles. She was terrified of the movie and we had to leave early. I did see the rest of the movie later and didn't find anything so "sweet" about it.

And for anyone who thinks watching stuff doesn't change how you think about things...well, if that were the case, then Madison Avenue has a lot of explaining to do for the billions they have bilked out of their clients.

 
At 8:05 AM, Blogger Everett said...

No, I understand the point of the site completely. It's clearly meant to offer guidance to those seeking it ... those who obviously hold a particular moral viewpoint. And of course I appreciate the role of context and message exposure, to a point. I do not believe that we're subjects to our environment, but that we're participants in it. If we were totally at the whim of media exposure and spending, well, then the political party with the most savvy media strategy would run the entire ... uhhh ... never mind.

I get your point. I and understand that some people ... possibly you ... find value in CAP Alert. But I'm also calling question on whether such granular and morally driven analysis doesn't encourage us to abdicate some of our perspective and maturity in how we judge media. (Not to mention the return on the investment. I mean, come on: Aren't there greater evils to fight, and greater media products to question, than The Incredibles?)

If anything, the point is precisely that language matters. Saying "fuck" matters. Saying "nigger" matters. And what's the consequence if we homogenize everything to the least common offensive denominator? It matters. It changes the system ... and in my view, not always for the better.

It's like the color beige. An interesting marketing fact for you: Least offensive color to most people--beige. Color people are least likely to note as their favorite color--beige.

I have to wonder if CAP Alert does not simply see itself as an "early warning system," but if it also sees itself as an advocacy effort. Is it saying "here's what's in the movie, Christian to Christian, so you know?" Or is it part of a larger discourse to say "Here's what's bad out there, and we need to fight it" ... of a larger desire to make the world beige.

Hey, if beige is your thing, more power to you. But not for me. I like my blacks and blues and reds and greens. Not everywhere, but at least out there in the world. And when I see anything that smells of squashing a system to the least of anything ... to making it beige ... well, it just rubs me the wrong way.

Differnt' strokes, I suppose.

One last thing: I'm sorry your five-year-old was scared. Not good for the child ... and a very young one at that ... and not good for the parent. But I have to say, it's a PG movie, not G (like Monsters, Inc.).

From the Motion Pictures Association of America web site "Movie Ratings / About" Page:

WHAT THE RATINGS MEANG:"General Audiences-All Ages Admitted."

This is a film which contains nothing in theme, language, nudity and sex, violence, etc. which would, in the view of the Rating Board, be offensive to parents whose younger children view the film. The G rating is not a "certificate of approval," nor does it signify a children's film.

Some snippets of language may go beyond polite conversation but they are common everyday expressions. No stronger words are present in G-rated films. The violence is at a minimum. Nudity and sex scenes are not present; nor is there any drug use content.

PG:"Parental Guidance Suggested. Some Material May Not Be Suitable For Children."

This is a film which clearly needs to be examined or inquired into by parents before they let their children attend. The label PG plainly states that parents may consider some material unsuitable for their children, but the parent must make the decision.

Parents are warned against sending their children, unseen and without inquiry, to PG-rated movies.

The theme of a PG-rated film may itself call for parental guidance. There may be some profanity in these films. There may be some violence or brief nudity. But these elements are not deemed so intense as to require that parents be strongly cautioned beyond the suggestion of parental guidance. There is no drug use content in a PG-rated film.

The PG rating, suggesting parental guidance, is thus an alert for examination of a film by parents before deciding on its viewing by their children.

Obviously such a line is difficult to draw. In our pluralistic society it is not easy to make judgments without incurring some disagreement. So long as parents know they must exercise parental responsibility, the rating serves as a meaningful guide and as a warning.
"The theme of a PG-rated film may itself call for parental guidance. There may be some profanity in these films. There may be some violence or brief nudity. But these elements are not deemed so intense as to require that parents be strongly cautioned beyond the suggestion of parental guidance. There is no drug use content in a PG-rated film." Seems that's exactly what you got in The Incredibles, but I'm sorry your child was frightened.

 
At 8:07 AM, Blogger Everett said...

Sorry, left off the MPA link:

http://www.mpaa.org/movieratings/about/index.htm

 

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Sunday, January 16, 2005

For The Record

Now 17-11 against the spread. Today's picks:
New England - 1 1/2 against the Colts

Eagles -
8 against the Vikes
May your horse come in.

Update: Again, bingo on both. Now 19-11 against the spread, and 7-1 in the NFL playoffs.

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Saturday, January 15, 2005

The NFL on CBS: Sucktacular!

Sitting here watching the Stillers / J.E.T.S.JETSJETSJETS game. It is, unfortunately, on CBS. Every time I see the NFL on CBS I'm struck by the total shittiness of their coverage. CBS NFL coverage is shit. S.H.I.T.SHITSHITSHIT.

Forget that CBS runs more commercials during their NFL coverage than any other network, never missing an opportunity to run even a 15 second spot. Today they torture us with Dick Enberg and Dan Dierdorff. Dierdorff is the only person on planet Earth that makes our fair president appear articulate. He's a graduate of the school of the painfully obvious, with striking observations such as "he lowers his head, and that will draw the flag every time" and trite cliches such as "you gotta dance with who brung ya." Enberg is, well, just very tired.

The wife and I were just remarking that it's football coverage for 73 year old white guys in Peoria. It's like the whole damn network is run by Dan Rather, not just the news organization. They're so out of touch, in fact, that they just ran their "Fantasy Notebook" segment, clearly with no appreciation of the fact that every fantasy league in the free world shut down with the end of the regular season. Don't you think it's a bit difficult to field a fantasy team when there's ... uhhh ... ONLY 12 TEAMS LEFT PLAYING!?!?!

Please, bring me FOX. Please ...

2 Comments:

At 8:16 PM, Blogger Charley Foster said...

Well yes, Fox. EXCEPT that Joe Buck is so indignant since he didn't GET Randy Moss' JOKE about the drunken Packers fans who stand out in the parking lot of Lambeau MOONING opposing teams as their buses drive past. Sheesh what a moralistic DICK.

(I was rooting for the Steelers. I win a tall scotch).

 
At 8:24 PM, Blogger Charley Foster said...

Can that be right - the Vikes are supposed to win by 7.5? Crap. That means they're going to lose.

 

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For The Record

Let's see here ... we're, uh, 15-11 against the spread at the moment. Here are today's picks:
Jets + 8 1/2 at Pittsburgh

Atlanta - 7 over the Lambs

May your horse come in!

Update: Bingo on both. 17-11 against the spread.

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The New New Thing

This product is at a tipping point:Airborne Effervescent Health Formula. Last weekend my wife brought some home. Thursday at the hotel gym I hear someone discussing it. My wife's been taking it off and on this week to fend off a cold; I took some before taking to the skies. Seems to work, and tastes decent, too. You heard it here first ...

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A Day In The Life: Friday

All times EST.
  • 8:15 am: Wake, shower.

  • 8:55 am: Leave home for office.

  • 9:00 am: Arrive office. Take phone meeting with client. Topic: three-hour leadership development session around communicating strategy for senior leadership team at retreat in February.

  • 9:30 am: Connect with folks at office, submit travel expenses, switch files for next trip, reply to email.

  • 11:00 am: Leave office to work from home rest of the day.

  • 11:10 am: Arrive at home; settle in. Work and process email as it comes.

  • 11:30 am: 360-degree feedback call with associate of a client I'm coaching. Keep working. Take a number of calls from clients and partners on mobile phone.

  • 3:00 pm: Brief phone meeting with client. Topic: change among leadership ranks.

  • 4:00 pm: Phone meeting with client. Topic: Planning next steps in transformation of their internal communication department and function.

  • 5:00 pm: Declare weekend as having officially arrived. Crack beer.

  • 5:30 pm: Last call of week: Weekly call with partners of firm.

  • 6:00 pm: Wife arrives from work. Begin making gin and tonics. Weekend is here!!!

2 Comments:

At 2:55 PM, Blogger Mr. Dart said...

Beer before liquor? How many time do I have to tell you???!!

 
At 11:06 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

bwaaaa --- what about "9:00 pm: Call brother 'about 20 gin and tonics into it,' converse about all things bright and beautiful (which I really don't recall), commiserate about the man who makes Dierdorf seem eloquent, make brother's day." you need a Friday night post-script function, big awesome bud.

 

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A Day In The Life: Thursday

All times EST:
  • 6:45 am: Wake, check email, get 15 minutes on the treadmill, shower, pack.

  • 8:30 am: Check out of the hotel; meet cab for ride to client location. Call office from cab.

  • 8:40 am: Arrive client location. Meet client.

  • 9:00 am - 10:30 am: Client meeting & videoconference. Topic: Engaging corporate communication team around the design of an internal communication measurement approach for the company.

  • 10:30 am - 11:00 am: Call office; check and respond to email on phone.

  • 11:00 am - 1:15 pm: Meeting and working lunch with client team to design next steps for implementing communication measurement approach.

  • 1:15 pm: Meet colleague who happens to be at the same client; chat about firm-wide meeting coming up Monday.

  • 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm: Meeting & video conference with second set of communication measurement stakeholders.

  • 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm: Phone conference with HR analysts to discuss research methodology for measurement approach.

  • 3:45 pm: Check office messages and email.

  • 4:00 pm: Meeting with client's boss to update on progress and discuss next steps.

  • 4:15 pm: Debrief with client.

  • 4:30 pm: Adjourn to lobby to wait for taxi; check mail, make some calls.

  • 4:45 pm: Depart client location for Penn Station. Drive down the GW Parkway; enjoy views of Potomac and Washington D. C.

  • 5:15 pm: Arrive Penn Station. Get ticket. Purchase a short cigar and enjoy a smoke outside the station while chatting with wife on the phone and waiting for my train.

  • 6:00 pm: Board Acela and depart Washington. Relax and listen to iPod on the train.

  • 7:35 pm: Arrive home station. Buy some flowers for wife and meet driver. Make trip home.

  • 8:10 pm: Arrive home!

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Thursday, January 13, 2005

A Day In The Life: Wednesday

Posting this a little late, but here was Wednesday's installment in "blog your life" week:
  • 4:00 am: Wake, check email, shower, and pack.

  • 5:00 am: Depart San Diego hotel; check office voice mail and leave message for wife on way to airport.

  • 5:15 am: Arrive Hertz facility, check in car, wait for bus, take bus to terminal. In the bay and visible from just about everywhere: #68.

  • 5:30 am: Arrive terminal, check in, navigate security and go to gate; check in with office while waiting for flight.

  • 6:15 am: Board flight. Check email on phone; read.

  • 6:30 am: Scheduled departure time. First delay announced. Weather in Chicago forces a ground stop on all inbound traffic. We wait. And wait. And wait. Our time moves. We leave the gate and taxi to a holding area. We wait. Time moves again. We wait. Process email on phone. Read. Wait. Blog from phone. Wait. Read. Wait. Keep client in Chicago posted about my status.

  • 9:45 am: Three and a half hours after boarding, we depart San Diego for Chicago. The movie is Wimbledon, which I saw on the way out, so I finish Blink on the plane.

  • 3:10 pm: Arrive Chicago O'Hare. Call car service to let them know I'm in and request a car. Exit terminal and wait for car.

  • 3:45 pm: Depart O'Hare and ride to client location. Check email on phone; check in with office.

  • 4:00 pm - 5:45 pm: Arrive at client and begin meeting. Topic: Prep for big speech next week.

  • 5:45 pm: Meet car and ride back to O'Hare. Try to catch a cat-nap in the car. Check on flight: delayed one hour 20 minutes.

  • 6:05 pm: Arrive O'Hare. Walk to Gate C 30 to try to board a very late but earlier flight; it's left. Walk for 20 minutes or so to get some exercise; walk back to B Terminal to get something to eat. See a flight leaving for Washington Reagan at Gate B 22. Head down there to stand by and get on.

  • 7:15 pm: Board flight for Washington Reagan. Read while flight boards.

  • 7:50 pm: Depart O'Hare. Listen to iPod and read. Switch over to listen to air traffic control on the headset. Over Cleveland, hear that Reagan is closed and flights are diverting to other cities.

  • 9:40 pm: Begin indefinite holding pattern. Hold for a while and finally get cleared into Dulles.

  • 10:30 pm: Arrive Dulles. Fog is exceedingly thick; the computer flies us all the way down to the runway. Exit plane and get on Dulles People Mover.

  • 11:10 pm: People mover finally arrives at terminal. Get cab and leave for Ritz.

  • 11:30 pm: Arrive Ritz Carlton in Tyson, Virginia. Check in and order room service. Check email and read a few blogs / watch TV to wind down.

  • 12:45 am: Lights out.

4 Comments:

At 11:39 PM, Blogger j said...

that's 15 minutes shy of 24 hours, b.a.b. no wonder you're so prolifically productive. sheesh.

 
At 11:52 PM, Blogger Everett said...

Well, not quite. I started 4 am PST and finished 12:45 am EST (which would be 9:45 PST). But a long day nonetheless.

 
At 9:14 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You never write, you never call. . .but at that hour of the night, we appreciate it. g

 
At 11:28 AM, Blogger C said...

Such a glamorous life...yuck. All that for 1.75 hours with a client.

 

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Union Station

Union Station

Don't know if you've ever been here, but Union Station in D.C. is one of the great train stations in the world. Hope this helps give you the flavor.

1 Comments:

At 10:15 PM, Blogger Everett said...

Not quite sure why that didn't load right; I'll fix it tomorrow.

 

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Washington Night

Washington Night

Wish you were here ...

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Lincoln

Lincoln

In a cab on my way to the train station ... little shot of the side of the Lincoln Memorial.

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Wednesday, January 12, 2005

You Landed In What?!?!

You Landed In What?!?!

We landed in this. Zero vis, all the way to the ground. The tech is called
"autolanding" and in all my flights, this was the lowest ceiling I've ever
seen.
___
Sent via my Treo 600

3 Comments:

At 8:44 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was once told that any landing you walk away from is a good landing. Is that in Chicago?g

 
At 11:24 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Low ceilings are the only thing that ever freak me out about flying. It's just unnerving.

 
At 10:15 PM, Blogger Everett said...

Washington D.C., acutally ... Dulles.

 

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CalCoast

CalCoast

Finally got off the ground. Here's a shot of San Diego Bay, Coranado, and
the coast.
___
Sent via my Treo 600

1 Comments:

At 8:21 PM, Blogger Christina said...

Cool pic and the technology with which you took it.

 

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Hurry Up And Wait

Hurry Up And Wait

O'Hare is closed for fog, abd here I sit in San Diego. Been on the plane
since 6:30 am PST-we'll not depart until at least 9:40.

Travel hint for you: When in this situation, piss as early and as often as
possible. After 6 or 7 hours those toilets get full, and you DON'T want to
go in there.

You're welcome.

For a while I could see the Marine recruits doing morning KP at Camp
Pendleton (right next to the airport). Out for a run on a sunny San Diego
morning. If for only an hour, I'd love to join them.

There are also two big carriers in the bay. Around much of the country, I
see few reminders that we're at war. Here the military is everywhere, and
it reminds me how fortunate I am to have so many fine men and women
willing to throw themselves into the breach.

So God speed, Marines and sailors. Be well, be safe, and thanks.
___
Sent via my Treo 600

1 Comments:

At 11:35 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just for clarification, Camp Pendleton is up by Oceanside. You were seeing the Marine Corps Recriut Depot which is adjacent to the airport in San Diego.

 

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Tuesday, January 11, 2005

A Day In The Life: Tuesday

Today's entry in the week's detailed life blog. All times Pacific.
  • 6:00 am: Wake, check and respond to email, get driving directions to morning client online and check traffic.

  • 6:30 am: 30 minutes on the elliptical trainer in the hotel gym, which has been moved to a covered vestibule by the pool while they refurbish the workout room. At first this seems a pain in the ass, but with it raining like hell and a view of the pool and palm trees, it turns out being quite cool. Read USA Today while exercising.

  • 7:00 am: Respond to an important email and read comments on Grand Staircase.

  • 7:15 am: Make coffee in room, shower, dress, send another email, write and post The Morning Read.

  • 8:30 am: Leave hotel. Realize earlier traffic report was highly erroneous; sit in traffic on the 805 heading to Del Mar. While in car check in with the office, listen to voice mail, leave a message for a client, and talk with another.

  • 9:10 am: Arrive at client location. Notice the sky is clearing as I enter the building (it's been raining here for two weeks); admire whitecaps on the ocean from the parking lot.

  • 9:10 am - 11:45 am: Coaching session with client. Topic: 2005 strategy messages and communication game plan.

  • 11:45 am: Conclude coaching session. Depart client and drive to second client location. Once again admire ocean from the parking lot; during drive discuss the firm's web site with graphic designer and admire F-18s doing touch and gos at Miramar.

  • 12:15 pm - 2:00 pm: Pick up client for coaching session over lunch (location: great place in San Diego's china town; menu: savory whole crab and pepper beef ... excellent, both). Topics: giving feedback and managing upward, as well as a dicey relationship with a peer.

  • 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm: Meet next client for next coaching session. We go to Starbucks because there are no meeting rooms available. Topic: Giving feedback, increasing visibility among team, and possible projects to "wow" senior leadership. Spend most of the session sitting outside in the sun. Try Starbucks' new Chantico. Hot chocolate on steroids. Have one before you die. Have two, and you just might.

  • 3:30 pm: Drop off client and wait in lobby for 4:00 pm coaching session. Check email, check office voice mail, and return a client call.

  • 4:00 pm - 7:15 pm: Final coaching session of day with final client of day. Topics: results of 360-degree feedback process, update on coaching work with subordinates, executive polish and presence.

  • 7:15 pm: Depart client office, listen to jets ramping up at Miramar (night ops tonight, I suppose) and return to hotel. Check email in car and call wife to say good night; ditch plans to eat in La Jolla given late hour.

  • 7:30 pm: Arrive at hotel. Continue conversation with wife. Check and respond to email, order room service. Take call from consultant from firm with which we have a partnership. Topic: communication strategy for impeding ERP at joint client. Read blogs; call airline regarding upgrade status for next week's flights to / from Barcelona; post to Grand Staircase. Pre-pack for tomorrow's departure.

  • 10:30 pm: Lights out.

2 Comments:

At 8:26 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You mentioned the rain. Are you seeing any signs of the devastion that's occuring from the rain and mudslides that we have seen on t.v.? g

 
At 10:21 PM, Blogger Everett said...

The streams were running very full, but other than than, none.

 

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I'm Still Astonished ...

... at how few people have experienced Red Vs Blue. Remember: They do all of this using a video game.

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Is It Possible To Be In Love With A Radio Station?

I don't know ... you can sure as hell have a crush. FM94/9, San Diego. Listen online and remember great radio.

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The Morning Read

Dashing today. San Diego is as wet as the news says, but no mudslides near me so far. Your morning reads:
  • You're my bestest friend, too! Bush appoints another buddy from Texas (and in this case, Harvard) to his inner circle. Pretty soon he'll have the whole frat! Wait until Condi sees these guys running around the Oval in tu-tus, smacking each other with wooden paddles. "Hey, Hubbs, Karly brought beer!"

  • Gutless. On the day CBS ditches four senior news folks over Memogate Andy Rooney has it right:
    The people on the front lines got fired while the people most instrumental in getting the broadcast on escaped.
    And on this day what does Dan Rather, paragon of TV journalism, do? He stays home. What he should have done was take his chair and report the story to the world. But I guess he's used to making discretionary choices about what he does and does not report. He needs to learn something from Eleanor Roosevelt:
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, 'I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.' ... You must do the things you think you cannot do.
    Ol' Dan still thinks courage is chaining himself to a hotel balcony during a hurricane. He's wrong, and yesterday, he was a coward.

  • Keep and eye on Kaktovik. And hope for the best.

  • The next blog: Astrochango. I don't know what it is, but I like it.
Good day to you all.

1 Comments:

At 4:05 PM, Blogger astrochango said...

Hey... thanx for the visit, I don't know what yours is either but I like it

 

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Monday, January 10, 2005

A Day In The Life: Monday

When people find out how much I travel, they often ask "how do you do it?" My answer: like anything else, you get used to it and you live like it's normal.

That said, as I was walking through the airport this morning I was thinking about my life of travel and I was thinking about Grand Staircase and I thought, "How do I do it? Why don't I blog it?" So I decided this week to blog my life in detail, morning to night.

Welcome to my world.

We'll begin with the beginning (always a good place to start). Here's today, Monday, January 11th.
  • 5:15 am: Rise with wife. Make coffee. Process morning email, read the morning news on the web, kiss wife goodbye as she heads to work, and blog until 7:15.

  • 7:15 am: Shower, pack, and print boarding pass.

  • 8:00 am: Meet driver and get in Town Car for ride to airport (I usually drive myself, but this trip is an exception). While in car review day, read new email, and read a Chicago Tribune article about a client on my Treo phone. Eat half an Atkins bar to take the edge of the appetite.

  • 8:35 am: Arrive at airport. Navigate security (only 5-10 minutes today), and spend 30 minutes walking the airport to get a little exercise. See a colleague and chat for a few minutes. Spend 10 minutes in line waiting to board flight.

  • 9:30 am: Board flight. Take seat in First Class (frequent travel has some advantages), call office, call wife, read Gladwell's Blink.

  • 9:30 am EST - 1:15 pm PST: With taxi time, flight time, and holding patterns, the flight from the East to West coast takes 6 and 3/4 hours. During that time I read Blink, eat lunch (a cold curry chicken wrap number ... ohh, the luxury!), watch the film Wimbledon (Kirstin Dunst stinks and is totally unconvincing but Paul Bettany is great as the male lead), catch a 45 minute nap, and work.

  • 1:15 pm: Disembark in San Diego.

  • 1:30 pm: Board Hertz bus, get rental car, and drive to client location. Call office, check email on phone, call wife, and have a project-related call with a colleague while in the car.

  • 2:15 pm: Grab lunch; catch up on news (via Treo phone) and email at table.

  • 3:00 pm - 5:15 pm: Coaching session with client. Today's issues: resolving a set of long-standing conflicts with a peer and managing up to her boss.

  • 5:15 pm: Depart client office. Drive into San Diego Gaslamp Quarter for dinner (part of my New Year's resolution to see more of the places to which I travel). Have "touch base" call with another colleague while in the car, take client call, check in with wife.

  • 6:00 pm: Arrive Gaslamp Quarter. Take 30 minute walk while evaluating places to eat.

  • 6:30 pm: Dinner at the bar at a San Diego brew pub. Watch OU/U Conn hoops game on bar TV; read news on Treo phone.

  • 6:55 pm: Take call from client; promise to return call shortly. Finish dinner.

  • 7:05 pm: Return call to client; coaching conversation regarding important presentation to management committee tomorrow and a difficult feedback conversation she needs to have with a subordinate. During call walk back to car and begin drive to hotel. Call wife as well to say good night.

  • 7:30 pm: Arrive hotel and check in.

  • 7:30 - 10:30 pm: Unpack, check and process email, read blogs (check out Bloglines if you haven't already), surf the web, all with TV on in background.

  • 10:30 pm: Lights out. (U:date: Or so I thought. Instead of getting some sleep like any reasonable person, I stay up until 11:45 watching TV. Not smart, given that it was 2:45 am EST.)

3 Comments:

At 8:52 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I wonder how your day would have gone if it took place as recently as the 1950s. Technology presents other opportunities doesn't it? g

 
At 9:28 AM, Blogger Mr. Dart said...

Interesting verb choice to "navigate" security. It sounds like Odysseus making his way through Scylla and Charybdis.

 
At 9:30 AM, Blogger Everett said...

I had some Scylla once, but a little penicillin cleared it right up ...

 

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The Morning Reads

A quick post before the car picks me up for the airport later this morning.

About the new Mac: Loving. It.

The switch from the PC has been effortless: the Mac has read every file, including all Office files, photos, graphics ... everything ... without difficulty. I did have to export / import the MS Money files into Quicken as .QIF files, but that's no surprise given how Microsoft doesn't like to play with competing software titles. Mail even reads my Microsoft Exchange Server data from work with no problem, so I have access to my office folders and contacts as well.

I've played with my wife's iBook some over the past year, but after a weekend of this I can't frankly see why anyone would ever buy a PC again. I know I won't. Being a power user I think I became desensitized to what a pain in the ass PCs can be to use ... and using the Mac has been effortless.

Besides, it looks better. And aesthetics matter.

Now, to the morning reads:
  • Just friends. Seems Jen and Brad are splitting up. Hard to believe: I typically expect megalomaniacs to stick together, but the world's full of surprises. More interesting is the part Angie might have played. Just goes to show you: it's possible to get tired of sleeping with any hot chick ... even Jennifer Aniston.

  • There's always the Trilateral Commission. What will Dick do now that most of his job's been done? What he did before: Running the Trilateral Commission and picking who will win the NCAAs every year.

  • Press "Triangle-Circle" to do a push up. Seems the geeks and the jocks are finally getting together with video games that make you skinny. If they could incorporate it into FFX, my wife will be the happiest person on Earth. Now if they could just create a Madden that gives me the body of Terrell Owens ...

  • The next blog: itsjustmehereat.
That is all.

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Unbiased, You Say?

Take Harvard's Implicit Association Test and see how unbiased you really are. (In the interest of full disclosure, I found I have a slight European American bias ... not surprising given that I grew up in Utah and had only 1 black kid in my high school class ... gives me something to work on.)

2 Comments:

At 9:43 AM, Blogger j said...

I don't know about your theory, bud -- my data suggested little or no bias for European over African Americans, and I grew up in Utah and only had one black student in my high school class, too. (I wonder if it was the same kid? Bwa ha ha). Seriously, it may just be the fast-twitch muscle cell thingy.

 
At 10:11 AM, Blogger Everett said...

Yeah, but you had close black friends in college, and still do to this day. There were no black people in my day-to-day until, well, just recently. True, I've been living in a very diverse east coast city for 12 years, and I have many black clients, but the day-to-day interaction just hasn't been there.

I know I still feel sensitive to saying the wrong thing, if that's any indication.

And it's not like I've been avoiding anyone. If anything, it's something I've seen as a weakness in my life for some time.

It also speaks to how segregated much of our society still is: that I can go through junior high, high school, college, and much of my career without a black counterparty. Hell, I can't tell you where the nearest black person is on my block. Not a good deal.

 

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Sunday, January 09, 2005

Run Dawgs, Run

I gotta tell you, I still like the wildcard dawgs. Today:
Denver +10 at Indy

Minny +6 1/2 at The Pack

May your horse come in.

Update: A split, but a split that makes me 3-1 against the spread for Round 1 of the playoffs, and 15-11 ATS if you include my bowl picks.

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Saturday, January 08, 2005

Just Call Me Mac Daddy

Typing this entry on our brand new iMac G5 (the 20-inch screen version). Very cool; glad I switched. Y'all are welcome to come over and see the thing.

I was thinking: "what the hell, let's pick the playoffs." So here goes:
Jets +7 at San Diego

St. Louis +4 at Seattle

May your horse come in.

Update: Booya, baby. Not only do the dawgs cover, they win outright. And I can look forward to collecting two sixers of good beer from Mr. H. You know who you are ...

2 Comments:

At 2:18 PM, Blogger Charley Foster said...

How bad are the Vikes going to get hammered?

 
At 11:48 PM, Blogger j said...

Come on, Charlie, he's a management consultant, not a psychic. Just bet his underdog picks, and send the kids to Princeton.

 

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Friday, January 07, 2005

Spamusement

Wonderful: Spamusement! Poorly-drawn cartoons inspired by actual spam subject lines!. Via IRTCSYDHT.

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The Morning Read

Back home for a few days before doing a San Diego / Chicago / Washington DC trip next week. Today feels like a vacation day just knowing that I'll be in my office (and that, time permitting, I'll be able to slip out a bit early).

Several items of note this morning:
  • You're my bestest friend! I'm sorry, but you'd think that, when faced the prospect of naming the highest cop in the land, you'd look a bit further than your best buddy from Texas. I'm sure Alberto Gonzales is a great guy and all, but is a man who described portions of the Geneva Convention as "quaint," and who argued for narrowing the definition of torture to "excruciating and agonizing pain," really the best man for the job? At least his definition qualifies the Bush legacy of Attorneys General as torture.

  • iParty, do you? The new new thing: iParties. Bring your iPod, select your 7-minute play list, plug into the PA, and rock the house. I dunno ... cool, I guess, but this close a marriage of geek, fad, and clubbing strikes me as oddly creepy. The concept has already crossed to Australia, so it must have some legs, but here's at least one guy who thinks iParties are for losers.

  • Who's the rat here? Remember the classic Fear Factor 100th episode from a few months back when the contestants had to eat blended rat shakes in the heart of Times Square? Ahhh, good times. Well, in a bid to further prove our increasing inability to take responsibility for our own fucking lives, paralegal Austin Aitken has filed suit against NBC for $2.5 million:

    The hand-written, four-page lawsuit said: "To have the individuals on the show eat and drink dead rats was crazy and from a viewer's point of view made me throw-up as well as another in the house at the same time."

    Mr Aitken, who lives in Cleveland, said that after becoming light-headed, he ran towards the bedroom and knocked his head in a doorway.

    Ouch. Maybe it knocked some sense into the silly bastard. In an ironic twist, the suit also states that NBC was "sending the wrong message to viewers that cash can make or have people do just about anything beyond reasoning." No kidding. Now, is NBC at fault for bad taste (pardon the pun)? Sure, but give me a break.

  • Huh? The day SI calls the Rams / Seahawks game a "marquee matchup" is the day SI has jumped the shark. I'll stick with esspin, thank you.

  • The next blog: Me, Myself n I. Prepare yourselves. At the very least, a view into how instant messaging is changing the English language ...
That is all for now.

6 Comments:

At 1:57 PM, Blogger Charley Foster said...

What kind of paralegal handwrites a complaint?

Anyway, I ought to sue HIM for evoking the indelible image of a doughy, 49 year-old “paralegal” leaping from the couch and projectile vomiting as he runs across the room headlong into a doorjamb. But then, I probably watch too much TV.

 
At 3:17 PM, Blogger Michele said...

I'm going to sue you for making me look at that blog.

 
At 11:29 PM, Blogger j said...

What really pisses me off is a sentence like "To have the individuals on the show eat and drink dead rats was crazy and from a viewer's point of view made me throw-up as well as another in the house at the same time." Key-ryst! I would bitch slap that drip 'til he crapped his pampers if he wrote that sentence in my law office, then fire him on the spot. Makes my skin crawl, really.

And, by-the-way, I'm sick and tired of this whole homo-sapien ethno-specie-ism. Cats eats rats all the time: what are we, better than cats? Rats are "gross," but cows, pigs, sheep, fish, squid, lobsters and Cornish game-hen are just ducky (no pun intended)? We're all carbon based, get over it.

 
At 11:42 PM, Blogger j said...

and Michelle, love, don't be so hard. She's a 20 year old Sinapore resident whose interests include "orcas, dusky dolphins, kitty, canoe polo, teddy bears, care bears, scrumpee, and looking pretty!" wtf do you want?

 
At 12:22 AM, Blogger Everett said...

Mmmmmm ... rats ...

 
At 7:45 AM, Blogger Michele said...

mmm...dolphins

 

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I Track Culture So You Don't Have To

I've been a Malcolm Gladwell fan for a long time. He's the science writer for the New Yorker, and several years ago produced his first book, The Tipping Point, which is about how ideas diffuse in social systems (or as he puts it, "social epidemics"). It explains, among other things, why VHS beat out Betamax, why Rudy Gullliani was able to clean up the NY subway system, and why one Chicago grandmother is a power broker of enormous national influence.

Great book, and it puts his talent of making reams of academic literature and research accessible on full display.

It's on display again in his latest book, Blink, which while not officially available, I was for some reason able to buy at an airport news kiosk this past Tuesday. Blink is about rapid cognition (or as Gladwell puts it, "thinking that happens in the blink of an eye"): gut reactions and first impressions and why, very often, they are equally or more reliable than lots of analysis ... unless they're not, as they often aren't when people instantly think tall people are more credible and black people are more dangerous.

Really cool book. Read it (and trust your instincts).

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Thursday, January 06, 2005

Aaaaaand We're Back

Back from vacation, back at work, back on the road, and at the moment, back in Minneapolis, where the temperature is back to 6 degrees above zero.

Cold enough to freeze the snot right in your nose, it is.

For what it's worth, my picks for the Auburn / V. Tech and USC/OSU games were V. Tech +5 1/2 (which covered) and USC -1 (which covered thirty times over). These picks not only won me some cold frosty beverages from others, they also took my record to two games over 500: 12-10. As J points out in the comments, I was much better at picking the dogs--8-3--than the other way 'round.

Live and learn (and, it seems, bet my dogs).

As for now, I'm in Minny today then back home for the weekend as I ramp up for a month that will take me to San Diego, Chicago, Washington D.C., Barcelona, and Chicago (again). So there are lots of stories (and pictures) to come.

And speaking of stories, I've already booked one for 2005: my flight into Minny next to a Minnesota Viking, a guy who's been in the league for eight years. Lots to share about that conversation, including this tid-bit: the league minimum salary for someone in the NFL for 8 years? $660,000. (I prefer to think of it as $40,000 a week). Lot of PlayStation games, that is.

Until later, keep warm.

Oh ... and here's the next blog: The Bitch Speaks.

6 Comments:

At 2:57 PM, Blogger Charley Foster said...

I lived 15 years in the mini-apple, and I got news - six above, if the wind is not blowing, is warm. But the people are friendly and the beer-serving establishments are plentiful.

 
At 6:58 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I agree with Charlie. Six above ain't nothin'. Be thankful you weren't there the week Christmas. And that you're not in an airport on the east coast trying to fly to the midwest right now.

 
At 6:59 PM, Blogger C said...

Oops. That was me. It's a good thing I'm only on my second gin and tonic after being here for four hours.

CB

 
At 12:32 AM, Blogger j said...

freeze the snot right in your nose? now THERE'S a pick worth betting on.

 
At 5:58 AM, Blogger Everett said...

C, people drinking gin & tonics in airport bars should not blog, just as people on ludes should not drive.

 
At 11:49 AM, Blogger C said...

That's me...living on the wild side.

 

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Saturday, January 01, 2005

Where's The Car?

Where's The Car?

1 Comments:

At 11:03 PM, Blogger j said...

did you rent the r-11's? did they RIIIIIPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!?

 

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For The Record

Two or three feet of snow last night, but sunny this morning. Wish you were here.

Still even at 7-7. We're still in a post-New Years Drunken Half-Naked Sledding Hangover News Embargo here, so I'm eager to see how these games are panning out. Today's picks:
FSU -10 over W. VA

Georgia - 7 1/2 over Wisconsin

LSU - 7 1/2 over Iowa

Michigan +7 over Texas


Tenn. + 3 1/2 over A&M


Pitt + 15 1/2 over Utah (but
GO UTES!!!)
Just cover, baby! And happy New Year!

3 Comments:

At 4:04 PM, Blogger mediaguru @ HookedOnGolfBlog.com said...

The pitt UTAH spread was 16.5. Did it go down? GO UTES.

 
At 12:47 PM, Blogger j said...

chin up, Everett -- it looks to me like you're 7 and 3 when picking the underdog. Of those 7, 5 were outright upsets (Wyoming, Iowa State, Navy, NIU and Tennessee), and your pick covered in 2 (Michigan and Boise State). UTEP only missed by 2 -- the only bad misses were Marshall over Cinnci and Pitt over Utah (that one serves you right). So if I'm gonna bet the boys' college education based on your advice, I figure I just bet on your underdog picks -- and they can all go to Princeton (unless they spend three years stoned in high school and blow our deal).

 
At 10:33 AM, Blogger mediaguru @ HookedOnGolfBlog.com said...

You can't pick against your home team!

UTES VICTORIOUS! 12-0 baby!!!

 

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